Einstein's Advice On How To Be Happy

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As an entrepreneur, I know you are not in business just to make money.

You’re also in business because you think it will make you happier.

With this in mind, you may be interested in the following true story.

Albert Einstein is known as one of the smartest guys in history.

And one of the wisest. (They don’t always go together)

In fact still today, decades after his death, his brilliant quotes about life appear worldwide.



The right way to respond to feature requests

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Even the best products with the most passionate users will have these “success gaps” – a disparity between your product and the user’s desired outcome.

It’s easy to respond to these feature requests with a generic “Keep an eye on Twitter for updates” response or a pre-canned “We’ll pass your feedback onto the product team” message, but we’ve found that it’s valuable to mine these feature requests for deeper information so that you fully understand what the customer is trying to achieve.

That way, you’ll be able to strike a balance between keeping customers happy and collecting valuable information that will improve your product’s core value.

Here’s our best practice guide for handling feature requests in customer support.

Read the rest of the article to learn more.


Excuses, excuses

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Claire Lew:

I was on the phone with a CEO the other week. He wanted my advice for how he could cultivate a more open, transparent company culture for his team.

This CEO seemed to be already doing a lot of the right things. He held monthly all-hands meetings to get everyone on the same page. He also regularly asked questions to his employees about what could be better in the company.

However, when I recommended one question that he ask his employees, he was a bit taken aback.

“You want me to ask my team: ‘Are there any benefits we don’t offer that you think we should?’ Hmm, I dunno, Claire,” he told me.

This CEO assured me that he welcomed and valued feedback from employees. But asking about company benefits? And asking about them so publicly? He started to feel nervous about it.

“I don’t want the feedback to be a distraction,” he shared. “There’s so much we already do around benefits — I think this could set the wrong expectations and derail people from getting their work done.”

He continued:

“And, I don’t think we’re ready to act on that feedback. If we ask that question, it implies we need to implement something. But it might not be cost-effective. If we can’t do it, I don’t want to let people down.”

I get it. I’m a CEO myself. No CEO wants her employees to be distracted. No CEO wants to make false promises.

Here’s the reality, though: If you dig deeper, those two statements are actually excuses that are keeping you from building the open, transparent company culture you’re keen on.

We work with everyone to build a better product, but I've seen this happen at other companies I've worked at and with over the years.


Cracking the Code on Startup Product Pricing Strategies

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If idea validation is about taking your business idea for a test-drive, then pricing your product is where the rubber really hits the road.

This is it. You’re done piloting. You’re done validating. You’re really done living on Ramen in an apartment you share with five roommates. You’re ready to come out and tell the world: “I have a product or service that provides value – and this is how much my product is worth.”

Needless to say, product pricing strategy is an essential piece of the startup puzzle – and it’s a notoriously tricky piece to get right. There are about a dozen moving pieces you have to take into account. Getting them all aligned just right is like unlocking the most complicated combination lock ever.

The crew at Startups.co wrote a great piece on figuring out Product Pricing Strategies, worth a read, and a bookmark and share.


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