David Heinemeier Hansson on why Writing software is hard

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David Heinemeier Hansson:

Good software is uncommon because writing it is hard. In the abstract, we all know that it is hard. We talk incessantly about how it’s hard. And yet, we also collectively seem shocked — just shocked! — when the expectable happens and the software we’re exposed to or is working on turns out poor.

This is classic cognitive dissonance: Accepting that writing software is hard, but expecting that all of it should be good.

It’s also an application of a just-world theory of effort and accomplishment. That despite the odds, everyone who has the right intent at heart, and puts in the work, will succeed. No they won’t. That’s just delusional. And those delusions are anything but harmless. When we expect good software to be the most likely outcome from the hardship of writing it, we’re setting ourselves up for inevitable disappointment. Even worse, if we feel we deserve good software from our imperfect efforts, we’ll project the inevitable failures on everyone and everything but ourselves.

Another good read from DHH.

We actually treat all of our code as if someone else will use it to develop or learn from at some point, so we try to follow a scheme to keep it easy to read and jump into. That's been our policy from before Flybase and continues to this day.